Tue12062022

Last updateMon, 05 Dec 2022 4pm

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Achieving a null CO2 footprint by cyanobacteria

Scientists at the National Biotechnology Centre are researching to develop industrial processes with a zero CO2 footprint based on recombinant strains of cyanobacteria. They have obtained a cyanobacteria strain that produces sucrose efficiently from CO2, and does not need osmotic stress neither high salinity environments, making it easier to cultivate. Scientists are now working to transfer the method to industry.

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Analysing water pollutants in situ and with a mobile phone

CSIC scientists have developed a disposable electrochemical sensor to detect contaminants in water. No sample pre-treatment is required and water can be analysed on site in the field. The sensor can be connected to a portable device, such as a mobile phone, and no specific training is needed to use it.

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Tools for the biodegradation of o-phtalate, a persistent organic pollutant

Scientists at the CSIC have developed biocatalysts that work as biotech tools for the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of o-phtalate (PA), a persistent organic pollutant detected in the environment, and its bioconversion into value-added biodegradable polymers. The invention consists in the generation of recombinant genetic cassettes and bacterial host cells to contain them.

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Biosensor for detecting estrone and estradiol in environmental samples

Estrogenic contaminants dispersed in the environment are a growing cause for concern. A new biosensor can specifically detect the estrogens estradiol and estrone in environmental samples without the need for specialised laboratories, in a fast, efficient and inexpensive process. The device is available for technology transfer.

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Rice husk transformed into a filter to remove contaminants in the water

Scientists from the Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Seville, in collaboration with the Technische Universität Berlin, have used rice husk, a waste product from rice cultivation abundantly produced in Spain, as a filter for the removal of organic contaminants in water treatment plants. The process generates more efficient filters than the commercial activated carbons used nowadays.

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