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Last updateThu, 26 Nov 2020 5pm

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New method for a controlled release of ophthalmic drugs

Scientists at the CSIC and the University of Zaragoza have developed a new formulation to achieve a controlled and sustained release of different drugs inside the eyeball. Industrial partners from the ophthalmic or pharmaceutical industry are being sought to collaborate through a patent licence agreement.

With this method is possible the simultaneous and controlled administration of several substances in the eye (Image: Bruno Henrique, Pixabay)Intravitreal injections are invasive and can increase the risk of retinal detachments, opportunistic infections and cataracts when repeated applications are required. The short half-life of the pharmacological substances administered requires frequent injections for the maintenance of effective concentrations, which are required for the treatment of chronic eye diseases.

In base of the short half-life of the drugs, alternative drug delivery systems and sustained-release inserts are being developed to overcome this limitation by reducing the frequency of injections. There is still a need to administering drugs, in a controlled released manner, to the posterior segment of the eye for the treatment of retinal and choroidal diseases.

Scientists at the CSIC and at the University of Zaragoza have developed a new formulation in powder form that is injected as a transparent colloidal dispersion, making it ideal for intravitreal administration without interfering with the vision.

The main advantage of the present technology, which is simple and affordable, is that reduces the number of injections required. The carrier is biocompatible and it is eliminated at the same time that the drug is released. With this method is possible the simultaneous and controlled administration of several substances in the eye. Also, side effects are reduced, as well as systemic absorption is minimized compared to other modalities of periocular administration.

Contact:
Dania Todorova Ph.D.
Institute of Chemical Synthesis and Homogeneous Catalysis
CSIC - University of Zaragoza
Tel.: +34 876 55 40 97
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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